The Festival Of Lohri And Its Significance

Lohri, the festival of worshiping fire is celebrated with fervour in North India. The festival that brings along joy and renewed energy for the new year. Families are seen getting together, dancing to the beats of dhol around the holy bonfire and enjoying a delicious feast. According to Hindu calendar, Lohri usually falls on the last day of the month of Paush while it falls on January 13 every year according to English calendar.

 

 lohri

 

The significance of Lohri:
• The term Lohri is derived from ‘Tilohri’ in which ‘til’ means sesame and ‘rorhi’ means jaggery. These foods are thrown into fire as part of the harvest ritual as they are believed to purify the body and geared up the energy for the new year.
• This festival is of great significance for the people of Punjab and Haryana. Lohri is associated with the agricultural happening of the farmers as it marks the arrival of harvesting season of Rabi crops.
• This festival is associated with Winter Solstice. Hence, it marks the conclusion of winter season and arrival of spring season.
• The first Lohri is considered very auspicious for the newlyweds and the newborn babies as the festival symbolize new beginnings.
Traditions of Lohri
• Lohri Songs are heard since the morning of this day when children go to neighbours singing folk songs and they are usually given savouries and money.  The songs mention the Sun and thanking him for returning.
• During this festival, the harvested fields are lit up with bonfires post-sunset around which families and friends have a get-together. People believe that walking around the Lord Agni can bring miracles in their life as their prayers will be heard.
• The bonfire ceremony is celebrated differently in different regions of Punjab. In some parts, a small figure of Lohri goddess is prepared with cow dung and kindled with fire while in the other parts the bonfire constitutes only of cow dung and wood.
• The fire is fed with black sesame seeds, jaggery, peanuts, gajak and popcorn during Parikrama where people shout “Aadar aye dilatherjaye” which states May honor come and poverty vanish!
The Festival Of Lohri And Its Significance
Lohri, the festival of worshipping fire is celebrated with fervour in North India. The festival that brings along joy and renewed energy for the new year. Families are seen getting together, dancing to the beats of dhol around the holy bonfire and enjoying a delicious feast. According to Hindu calendar, Lohri usually falls on the last day of the month of Paush while it falls on January 13 every year according to English calendar.
The significance of Lohri:
• The term Lohri is derived from ‘Tilohri’ in which ‘til’ means sesame and ‘rorhi’ means jaggery. These foods are thrown into fire as part of the harvest ritual as they are believed to purify the body and geared up the energy for the new year.
• This festival is of great significance for the people of Punjab and Haryana. Lohri is associated with the agricultural happening of the farmers as it marks the arrival of harvesting season of Rabi crops.
• This festival is associated with Winter Solstice. Hence, it marks the conclusion of winter season and arrival of spring season.
• The first Lohri is considered very auspicious for the newlyweds and the newborn babies as the festival symbolize new beginnings.
Traditions of Lohri
Lohri Songs are heard since the morning of this day when children go to neighbours singing folk songs and they are usually given savouries and money.  The songs mention the Sun and thanking him for returning.
• During this festival, the harvested fields are lit up with bonfires post-sunset around which families and friends have a get-together. People believe that walking around the Lord Agni can bring miracles in their life as their prayers will be heard.
• The bonfire ceremony is celebrated differently in different regions of Punjab. In some parts, a small figure of Lohri goddess is prepared with cow dung and kindled with fire while in the other parts the bonfire constitutes only of cow dung and wood.
• The fire is fed with black sesame seeds, jaggery,peanuts, gajak and popcorn during Parikrama where people shout “Aadar aye dilatherjaye” which states May honor come and poverty vanish!

 

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